• How to write your first sexy story with renowned erotic author Mathilde Madden

    Searching for sexFollowing on from the huge response on this site from the recent posting of an excerpt from Mathilde Madden's short story Wheels On Fire (published as part of Black Lace's Wicked Words 10 and developed into a beautiful and engaging novel called Equal Opportunities), who better than Mathilde to advise you on how to write your first erotic short story?

    Whether you want to try your hand at writing a sexy short for your partner as a kinky present, or whether you have always fancied trying your hand as an erotic writer but have never known where to start, Mathilde's immense experience at writing erotic stories and novels will be a great asset in helping you begin your first story.

    Read Mathilde's six steps to writing your first erotic short story below, then get writing!


    1. Use story
    For a sexy story to be something that other people will enjoy reading, it needs to be an actual story. More than tab A fitting into slot B, a story will make the reader care about and understand the characters. Caring about the characters is what makes people care about the story. It's what makes the reader enjoy feeling the vicarious emotions of the people in the story. It's what makes other people having sex feel sexy to the reader.

    Try sketching out some notes before you begin. Give your story a beginning, showing characters and set up; a middle with sex, and an end with some kind of twist or resolution. OK, I have read (and written) stories where the sex happens right at the start and where the sex itself is the conclusion, but this kind of structure is a good place to start.

    2. Use tension
    Depending on your word count limits or your stamina, try and make your characters and your readers wait a while before giving them what they want. Draw out the sexual tension. Let the readers know just what the characters want. Let them know just how sweet it will be when they get it. And then make them wait for it. See how long you can have them turning the pages thinking 'please, please.' Make them beg.

    Judge it perfectly, artfully. Use your instincts – don't stretch the tension so far it snaps and everyone gets the giggles. Consummate at just the right point and feel the earth move.

    In one of my short stories Day Fourteen, published in the Black Lace collection Sex in the Office, I took sexual tension to extremes. My heroine is trying hard not to have an orgasm to win a bet with her boyfriend Duncan. The entire story is tension as he taunts her with dirty phone calls, texts and notes trying to make her give in.

    I unfolded the piece of paper. Written on it was one sentence – 'You know you want to, baby' – and below that was a photograph. A photograph that was about as pornographic as was possible with our cheap inkjet printer. When I looked at it my cunt just went 'thump.' It was of Duncan, naturally, lying on the bed with one hand wrapped around his hard cock. He was naked, looking sideways into the camera, with narrowed eyes as he stroked himself. He looked beautiful. Bastard. Beautiful bastard.

    I was so damn horny looking at this picture I was practically crying with frustration.


    3. Use Emotion
    Emotion is far more of a friend to a sex storywriter than friction. Remember the difference between writing and visual media. This is not a porn film. Long sections of action and movement can work brilliantly on the screen but not so well on the page. Long descriptions of limbs moving and lips parting get tedious. You need to break them up with something. Break them up by telling us how the characters are feeling. Do what the films can't do by telling us what is running through the character's heads.

    In my Black Lace novel about disability and disability fetishism Equal Opportunities, the story is told from the first person points of view of both the hero and the heroine, making it a perfect place to insert lots of internal monologues about the sexy action. For example:

    I'm out of my wheelchair and crawling for her. A weird fucked-up creature dragging itself across the carpet. And, god, I really shouldn't like this so much. It's every kind of objectification. But sparks of arousal are flying all over my body. I can scarcely tell which parts of me are which. I want to scream at her for her to take me. Use me. Make me into a mere thing. I want her to stride across the floor to me and fuck me. Force herself inside me. Own me.

    4. Use dialogue
    Not everyone is chatty when they're in bed, but talking dirty can work so well in a story it's a shame to have your characters keep quiet. In Semi Detached, the serial I write for Scarlet Magazine, one of the characters Max is almost as renowned for his sexy mouth as he is for his sexy body:

    Max used her hair to turn her head to one side. 'Are you ready for my cock yet, you sexy fucking bitch?' he growled in her ear; using his sex voice; all delicious and gravely.

    'Uh,' Lisa said. Max's filthy mouth usually made her incoherent.

    'Well? Come on, baby, it's so hard for you. Can you feel it? Can you feel that?' He pressed his iron-rod erection against the crease between her crotch and inner thigh, which was already slightly wet and sticky.

    5. Use your kinks
    I started writing because I couldn't find exactly the things I wanted to read. Whether this is the case with you or not, it is worth starting by writing something you would love to read and would find really hot. In fact, even now, on my fourth novel and with dozen of short stories written, I still stick to scenarios that I would enjoy reading. Luckily for me, there are many of those. You don't have to have done the things you are writing about – although erotic memoir is a lot of fun, too – but you need to think that they are hot.

    Bondage and other kinky themes do tend to lend themselves well to written erotica, perhaps because these fantasies are often more about the things going on in the head than in the groin. So if you have a dirty, kinky bondage fantasy, try writing that. One caveat I would add to this though, is that describing the way someone is tied up in great detail can often come unstuck. I like bondage, but nothing can give me a case of slidey eye (where I start skimming the page for something more exciting) than a long description of how someone is tied. Stick to the basics like spreadeagled on the bed, or writs tied behind the back. Or if you want something more complex, work extra hard to keep the description succinct. In my short story Public Relations in the forthcoming Black Lace collection Sex in Public, I wanted to talk about a complicated bit of bondage, so I made the whole tie up part of the story. For example:

    Laura clasps her hands behind her back and then slowly raises them up in the air, bending over automatically as she does so, until her arms are pointing straight up – perfectly vertical and rigid in the air – and her body is parallel to the floor. 'Strappado. Oh, yes.'

    [...] Silently, Miles straightens and catches Laura's patiently pre-positioned wrists in one hand, flicking the rope he is holding into place with the other; capturing them with bondage-master ease. He knows it feels like love making to her when he wraps the ropes around her like this. More intimate than any caress. And he knows she's never known anyone who could give her what she needs – what she hates to admit she needs – like he can.

    As Miles works on, throwing the end of the rope around the beam and securing it, Laura says nothing more that is intelligible apart from one single half-gasped 'God, tighter' as he clinches her elbows strictly behind her back.

    6. Avoid the clichés
    This is probably the most important thing of all. Some scenarios just come up in erotica again and again. Popular fantasies are all very well, but a fresh twist on the dungeon, harem, kidnap story is so much more exciting. Euphemistic words and phrases are often cliché, too. There was probably once a time when calling an erect cock a 'throbbing member' was fresh and new, but nowadays it in almost everyone's pet hate list. My personal bugbear is 'cream.' If I read about 'cream' emanating from either a man or a woman I throw the book across the room.

    I try to write fresh new stories. From my first novel, Peep Show, which was about a woman who spies on gay men having sex, to the disability fetishism I talk about in Equal Opportunities, I like to think these are not things that have been done a million times before.

    I am also very fond of my story Pervertables in the forthcoming B is For Bondage (from Cleis Press, just because the theme – a couple of kinky gay men going shopping – makes the story feel fresh and fun. For example:

    More and more frustrated now, by your continual teasing, I find myself starting to get sulky. When you pick up two rolls of black duct tape a second later, I decide I'm not playing anymore. I don't even bother to imagine you using that tape to lash my arms behind my back or strap me to a chair. I just raise my eyebrows petulantly, as if to say, 'Duct tape? How dull. Is that really the best you could find to tease me with, what about a table tennis bat or an egg whisk?'

    Mathilde Madden's Equal Opportunities is available now on paperback from Black Lace priced £7.99. For more information on Mathilde and her writing, visit: www.mathildemadden.co.uk

    Comments (1)

    • raymond senior: April 08, 2009 22:50
      a very helpfull site, perfct advise thank's.
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